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    Physics

    Physicists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have observed a magnetic phenomenon called the "anomalous spin-orbit torque" (ASOT) for the first time. Professor Virginia Lorenz and graduate student Wenrui Wang, now graduated and employed as an industry scientist, made this observation, demonstrating that there exists competition between what is known as spin-orbit coupling and the alignment of an electron spin to the magnetization. This can be thought of as analogous to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Could the Higgs boson still surprise us? Since its discovery in 2012, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at CERN have been actively studying the properties of this latest and most mysterious addition to the Standard Model of particle physics. [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Showcasing precise control at the quantum level, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for making an ion (electrically charged atom) display exact quantities of quantum-level motion—any specific amount up to 100 packets of energy or "quanta," more than five times the previous record high of 17. [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Transporting droplets on solid surfaces at high speed and long distances without additional force, even against gravity, is a formidable task. But a research team comprising scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and three other universities and research institutes has recently devised a novel mechanism to transport droplets at record-high velocity and distance without extra energy input, and droplets can be moved upward along a vertical surface, which has never been achieved before. The new strategy to control droplet motion can open up new potential in applications in microfluidic devices, bio-analytical devices and beyond. [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Researchers from the Nanophotonic Technology Centre (NTC) of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) have designed new silicon nanoantennas with direct applications in communication and data processing for the next generation of reconfigurable photonic chips. This type of configuration opens the door to the development of new miniature nanobiosensors and to the design of future systems and networks based on quantum optics. The work of the UPV researchers has been published in the ACS Photonics journal. [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Optical microscopes and tweezers can image and manipulate objects at the microscale for applications in cellular and molecular biology. The optical resolution is, however, hampered by the diffraction limit and therefore both microscopes and tweezers are unable to image and manipulate nano-objects directly. Emerging techniques in plasmonic/photonic nanoscopes and nanotweezers aim to achieve nanometer-scale resolution, although high-index material structures can easily cause mechanical and photothermal damage to the nanoscale biospecimens. [...]
    Mon, Jul 22, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Generally, matter exists in three distinct forms: as a solid, a liquid or a gas. Past physics research, however, has unveiled other curious states of matter, one of which is supersolidity. In a supersolid state, particles are arranged into a rigid crystal and can nonetheless flow through the solid without any friction. Although this may appear contradictory, this state is allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. [...]
    Fri, Jul 19, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Inventors of centuries past and scientists of today have found ingenious ways to make our lives better with magnets—from the magnetic needle on a compass to magnetic data storage devices and even MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) body scan machines. [...]
    Thu, Jul 18, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    When ring-shaped electromagnets are set up in linear arrangements, they can produce magnetic fields resembling a tube with a cone at each end—a structure that repels charged particles entering one cone back along their path of approach. Referred to as 'magnetic mirrors', these devices have been known to be a relatively easy way to confine plasma since the 1950s, but they have also proven to be inherently leaky. In a study published in EPJ D, physicists led by Wen-Shan Duan at Northwest Normal University, and Lei Yang at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, both in Lanzhou, China, show that these plasma leaks can be minimised if specific conditions are met. Using computer simulations, the physicists analysed the dynamic properties of a high-energy proton plasma beam within a magnetic mirror and fine-tuned the simulation settings to maximise its confinement. [...]
    Thu, Jul 18, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
    Over the last few decades, the exponential increase in computer power and accompanying increase in the quality of algorithms has enabled theoretical and particle physicists to perform more complex and precise simulations of fundamental particles and their interactions. If you increase the number of lattice points in a simulation, it becomes harder to tell the difference between the observed result of the simulation and the surrounding noise. A new study by Marco Ce, a physicist based at the Helmholtz-Institut Mainz in Germany and recently published in EPJ Plus, describes a technique for simulating particle ensembles that are 'large' (at least by the standards of particle physics). This improves the signal-to-noise ratio and thus the precision of the simulation; crucially, it also can be used to model ensembles of baryons: a category of elementary particles that includes the protons and neutrons that make up atomic nuclei. [...]
    Thu, Jul 18, 2019
    Source: Physorg Physics Category: PHYSICS
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