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    Researchers model how toxic proteins course through the brain, lead to disease

    Many neurodegenerative diseases spread by hijacking the brain’s connective circuitry to transport toxic proteins, which gradually accumulate and trigger symptoms of dementias. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and colleagues have modeled how these toxic proteins spread throughout the brain to reproduce the telltale patterns of atrophy associated with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Physics

          

    Researchers discuss the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion

    Researchers from NC State University have determined the probability of finding a gluon inside the pion. The Abstract sat down with graduate student and lead author Patrick Barry and his research advisor Chueng Ji, professor of physics at NC State, to talk about what this finding means for our understanding of how the universe works. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Physics

          

    Superconductivity and ferromagnetism fight an even match

    Russian physicists from MIPT teamed up with foreign colleagues for a groundbreaking experimental study of a material that possesses both superconducting and ferromagnetic properties. In their paper published in Science Advances, the researchers also propose an analytical solution describing the unique phase transitions in such ferromagnetic superconductors. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Physics

          

    New understanding of the solidification of high-pressure ice found in ‘ocean world’ planets

    A team of theorists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has solved a long-standing puzzle in the nucleation of a high-pressure phase of ice known as ice VII, which is believed to exist near the core of “ocean world” planets recently detected outside of the solar system, and has recently been discovered to exist within the Earth’s mantle. The findings are described in a paper published today by Physical Review Letters. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Physics

          

    World’s fastest camera freezes time at 10 trillion frames per second

    What happens when a new technology is so precise that it operates on a scale beyond our characterization capabilities? For example, the lasers used at INRS produce ultrashort pulses in the femtosecond range (10-15 s), which is far too short to visualize. Although some measurements are possible, nothing beats a clear image, says INRS professor and ultrafast imaging specialist Jinyang Liang. He and his colleagues, led by Caltech’s Lihong Wang, have developed what they call T-CUP: the world’s fastest camera, capable of capturing 10 trillion (1013) frames per second (Fig. 1). This new camera literally makes it possible to freeze time to see phenomena—and even light—in extremely slow motion. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Physics

          

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