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    General Chemistry

    Tax rule for industry rewards carbon capture

    When it comes to encouraging manufacturers to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a carrot might be more effective than a stick. That’s the approach taken by a recent U.S. tax code rule that offers credits to companies that capture and then store or use CO2. The rule will likely spur innovations in carbon capture technology, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

    Chemists learn how to detect phenols in smoked food samples using vitamin B4

    Today, phenols are used to produce medicines, paints, and inexpensive furniture made of chipboard or MDF panels and also to process food. Some of them are capable of imparting a pleasant smoky aroma to food, so they are often added to sausage or fish. But if we eat something that is high in phenols, it can have a deleterious effect on our health, so at factories they pay close attention to their concentrations in food. During tests, more often than not meat samples are dissolved in alkalis (in which phenols are very soluble), but the resulting emulsions require additional purification from the fats contained in sausage. …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

    Motley crew: Rust and light a possible answer to the conundrum of hydrogen fuel production

    In today’s narrative of climate change, pollution, and diminishing resources, one fuel could be a game-changer within the energy industry: hydrogen. When burned in a combustion engine or in an electrical power-plant, hydrogen fuel produces only water—making it far cleaner than our current fossil fuels. With no toxic gas production, no contribution to climate change, and no smog, hydrogen may be the answer to a future of cleaner energy, so why is it not more widely used? …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

    Team develops separator that reduces gas crossover for water electrolyzer

    Dr. Won-chul Cho of the Hydrogen Research Department of the Korea Institute of Energy Research (President Jong-nam Kim) has developed a separator membrane that significantly reduces gas crossover while exhibiting high performance comparable to the commercial separator used with alkaline water electrolyzer process. The research has been published in the International Journal of Energy Research, the world’s leading authority on nuclear power energy. …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

    Discovery of entirely new class of RNA caps in bacteria

    The group of Dr. Hana Cahová of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, has discovered an entirely new class of dinucleoside polyphosphate 5’RNA caps in bacteria and described the function of alarmones and their mechanism of function. The discovery was recently published in the journal Nature Communications. …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

    Separation chemistry: A step toward greener metal recycling processes

    Liquid-to-liquid extraction is the basic process used in hydrometallurgy for recycling metals and decontaminating solvents (to recover molecules that can be re-used or to decontaminate them). Until now, the “recipes” used in chemical processes have been based on operating feedback and theories that are only partly understood. No physical and chemical predictive models have been available to optimize experiments, particularly in the case of using several extractants together. …read more

    Source:: PhysOrg Chemistry

          

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