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    Astronomy

    First detection of the cosmic monster explosions with ground-based gamma-ray telescopes

    The strongest explosions in the universe produce even more energetic radiation than previously known: Using specialized telescopes, two international teams have registered the highest energy gamma rays ever measured from so-called gamma-ray bursts, reaching about 100 billion times as much energy as visible light. The scientists of the H.E.S.S. and MAGIC telescopes present their observations in independent publications in the journal Nature. These are the first detections of gamma-ray bursts with ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. DESY plays a major role in both observatories, which are operated under the leadership of the Max Planck Society. …read more

    Source:: Physorg space news

          

    Breaking the limits: Discovery of the highest-energy photons from a gamma-ray burst

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief and extremely powerful cosmic explosions, suddenly appearing in the sky, about once per day. They are thought to result from the collapse of massive stars or the merging of neutron stars in distant galaxies. They commence with an initial, very bright flash, called the prompt emission, with a duration ranging from a fraction of a second to hundreds of seconds. The prompt emission is accompanied by the so-called afterglow, a less brighter but longer-lasting emission over a broad range of wavelengths that fades with time. The first GRB detected by the MAGIC telescopes, known as GRB 190114C, reveals for the first time the highest energy photons measured from these objects. …read more

    Source:: Physorg space news

          

    NASA applying AI technologies to problems in space science

    Could the same computer algorithms that teach autonomous cars to drive safely help identify nearby asteroids or discover life in the universe? NASA scientists are trying to figure that out by partnering with pioneers in artificial intelligence (AI)—companies such as Intel, IBM and Google—to apply advanced computer algorithms to problems in space science. …read more

    Source:: Physorg space news

          

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could find more of Earth’s transient moons

    It is a well-known astronomical convention that Earth has only one natural satellite, which is known (somewhat uncreatively) as “the moon.” However, astronomers have known for a little over a decade that Earth also has a population of what are known as “transient moons.” These are a subset of near-Earth objects (NEOs) that are temporarily scooped up by Earth’s gravity and assume orbits around our planet. …read more

    Source:: Physorg space news

          

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