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    Experiment closes critical gap in weather forecasting

    Scientists working on the next frontier of weather forecasting are hoping that weather conditions 3-to-4 weeks out will soon be as readily available as seven-day forecasts. Having this type of weather information—called subseasonal forecasts—in the hands of the public and emergency managers can provide the critical lead time necessary to prepare for natural hazards like heat waves or the next polar vortex. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Latest

          

    Giant Enhancement of Second Harmonic Generation Accompanied by the Structural Transformation of 7‐Fold to 8‐Fold Interpenetrated Metal–Organic Framework (MOF)

    “A baby cheetah leaps several feet more than the cheetah mom” is an old saying in Tamil. In this case, an 8‐fold interpenetrated MOF shows a giant enhancement of the second harmonic generation (SHG) as compared to the parent 7‐fold interpenetrated MOF. As shown in the Research Article (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/anie.20191163210.1002/anie.201911632) by R. E. Dinnebier, Q.‐H. Xu, J. J. Vittal et al., the 8‐fold interpenetrated MOF results from the removal of DMF from the channel in a single‐crystal‐to‐single‐crystal transformation.

    …read more

    Source:: Angewandte Chemie Int. edition

          

    Chameleon Metals: Autonomous Nano‐Texturing and Composition Inversion on Liquid Metals Surfaces

    Chameleon metals: Metal passivating oxide layer is a complex pseudo‐equilibrium system with a plethora of undiscovered features. In their Research Article (DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/anie.20191263910.1002/anie.201912639), M. Thuo et al. exploit the complexity of this thin oxide layer to engineer surface design and structure, resulting in the formation of compositionally inverted surface features and nano‐scale fractal‐like designs.

    …read more

    Source:: Angewandte Chemie Int. edition

          

    Microporosity of a Guanidinium Organodisulfonate Hydrogen‐Bonded Framework

    Pores now found! The porous polymorph of guanidinium 1,4‐benzenedisulfonate, G2BDS, one of the simplest members of an archetypal class of hydrogen‐bonded frameworks, was prepared from its acetone solvate by single‐crystal‐to‐single‐crystal (SC‐SC) desolvation. The persistent porosity, phase behavior, and gas sorption characteristics are described.

    Abstract

    Guanidinium organosulfonates (GSs) are a large and well‐explored archetypal family of hydrogen‐bonded organic host frameworks that have, over the past 25 years, been regarded as nonporous. Reported here is the only example to date of a conventionally microporous GS host phase, namely guanidinium 1,4‐benzenedisulfonate (
    p

    ‐G2BDS).
    p

    ‐G2BDS is obtained from its acetone solvate, AcMe@G2BDS, by single‐crystal‐to‐single‐crystal (SC‐SC) desolvation, and exhibits a Type I low‐temperature/pressure N2 sorption isotherm (SABET=408.7(2) m2 g−1, 77 K). SC‐SC sorption of N2, CO2, Xe, and AcMe by
    p

    ‐G2BDS is explored under various conditions and X‐ray diffraction provides a measurement of the high‐pressure, room temperature Xe and CO2 sorption isotherms. Though
    p

    ‐G2BDS is formally metastable relative to the “collapsed”, nonporous polymorph,
    np

    ‐G2BDS, a sample of
    p

    ‐G2BDS survived for almost two decades under ambient conditions.
    np

    ‐G2BDS reverts to zCO2@
    p

    ‐G2BDS or yXe@
    p

    ‐G2BDS (y,z=variable) when pressure of CO2 or Xe, respectively, is applied.

    …read more

    Source:: Angewandte Chemie Int. edition

          

    Electronic map reveals ‘rules of the road’ in superconductor

    Using a clever technique that causes unruly crystals of iron selenide to snap into alignment, Rice University physicists have drawn a detailed map that reveals the “rules of the road” for electrons both in normal conditions and in the critical moments just before the material transforms into a superconductor. …read more

    Source:: Physorg Latest

          

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